Chocolate-Butterscotch Oatmeal Cookies

Chocolate-Butterscotch Oatmeal Cookies-2

 

My stove has been doing the strangest thing for the last couple of years.  When the range is warm from the oven or broiler being used, I can’t use the low setting of my front burners without the igniter clicking incessantly.  Over time, I’ve figured out that If I turn on one of the back burners while I use the front ones, the clicking will stop, allowing me to simmer a pot of soup without the ticking noise.  Not really a problem, I thought.

Well, my husband didn’t see it that way.  I finally explained to him what the stove has been doing after he heard the clicking recently.  He asked, “How could you live with that?”

The only answer I had was that I didn’t think it was worth mentioning.

 

Chocolate-Butterscotch Oatmeal Cookies-7

 

My workaround wasn’t good enough for him so he promptly called an appliance technician to fix the problem.  He’s wonderful this way. I found the stove issue mildly annoying but not enough to deem it a problem.  My husband on the other hand likes for everything to function properly and to be in tip-top condition.  If he can’t fix something himself (and he’s quite a handy fellow) he will find someone who can.

So last week the Viking doctor came over, my husband relayed the problem, a part was replaced and my stove was deemed as good as new.

 

Chocolate-Butterscotch Oatmeal Cookies-5

 

But when I baked these cookies last Sunday then shortly after used the stove to prepare dinner, I discovered that the problem hadn’t been solved at all.  This time, I decided to call the appliance repair shop myself.  In defense of my husband and the repairman, they’re not familiar with the issue so something might have been lost in translation when the problem was being described.  The woman on the other line was puzzled by it, too–the oven and the stove are independent mechanisms, she said, so this shouldn’t happen.  Though I knew she believed me, I found myself saying, “I swear this is what really happens”…or something to that effect.

I am guessing that the technician genuinely considered the problem fixed when he found a part that needed replacing–and this is fine by me.  His company has been responsive and quick to set up another visit.  This time, however, I’ll make sure the oven is warm when he arrives so he might see just what has been causing the igniter problem.

But there’s no sense in letting the warmth of the oven go to waste–it would be the perfect excuse to make a second batch of these delightful cookies.  I added cocoa powder to my favorite oatmeal cookie recipe and swapped out the nuts and raisins for butterscotch chips that I bought on a whim a few months ago.  I never did find anything appealing to make with the latter so this was sort of a last effort to salvage them before parting with them completely.  But they worked here.  The cookies are just mildly chocolatey with the soft sweetness coming from the chips.

I might even be willing to wrap a few of them as a gift for the technician.  That is if he can solve this clicking mystery for me…

 

Chocolate-Butterscotch Oatmeal Cookies-4

 

5.0 from 2 reviews
Chocolate-Butterscotch Oatmeal Cookies
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
A favorite oatmeal cookie recipe is made new again with cocoa powder and butterscotch.
Author:
Recipe type: Snacks
Cuisine: American
Serves: 18 cookies
Ingredients
  • ¼ pound (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • ½ cup brown sugar, lightly packed
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¾ cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder (heaping, don't level)
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2¼ tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1½ cups old-fashioned oatmeal
  • ¾ cup butterscotch chips
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (I've used a hand mixer successfully, too), beat the butter, brown sugar and granulated sugar together on medium-high speed until the mixture is light and fluffy. Turn the mixer down to low and add the vanilla and eggs (one at a time).
  3. In another bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, cocoa powder, cinnamon and salt. Again, with the mixer on low, slowly add the dry ingredients to the butter mixture. Stir in the oats and butterscotch chips just until combined.
  4. Use a small ice-cream scoop to drop 2-inch mounds of dough onto sheet pans lined with parchment paper. Flatten slightly with a damp hand. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, until lightly browned. Cool on a wire rack before enjoying

 

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Comments

  1. not bad! So i guess it’s good that your husband came to know the problem :) the cookies sounds like the kind I would love to bake and I also love that you made a small batch. It’s perfect for two!

  2. These cookies look so yummy! The flavors of chocolate, oatmeal and butterscotch sound great together!

  3. Yes please! How do I get a dozen?? ;-)

  4. Love the flavor combination of these cookies, Jean! Somehow I think a few of these would be quite the motivator for your stove technician ;).

  5. Love everything about these cookies, Jean! The combo of flavors is marvelous!!!

  6. Not long ago, my husband and I got in my car to go somewhere. I guess we had mostly been using his car previous to that because we were no further than the corner when he said “How long has your car been making this noise??” I said “Oh that….I think it’s always done that! Right?” You can pretty much guess the conversation went down hill from there. Your cookies would have probably won me some points in that automotive repair debate!
    My Volvo now runs fine but I will bake them this weekend to sweeten the holiday all the same! xo
    Karen State
    Peppermint and Plaid

  7. Like your husband, I like when everything functions properly…

    Lovely cookies! I would not be capable of stopping with one.

    cheers,

    Rosa

  8. Love me some chocolate oatmeal cookies and these look phenomenal- but then I got to the part where you write that you have a Viking stove and I was consumed with jealousy. Hope it starts running more smoothly soon!

  9. You are not the only one with a strange stove but your problem does sound quite unique. One of my ovens simply burns the tops of all my baking while the smaller second oven heats unevenly and my baking comes out lopsided. And it’s a De Longhi!

  10. I know the ticking noise must become a little bit intrusive after a while – but I think it gives yours stove character and charm (in a rather roundabout way, I’d miss it!). :)

    These cookies look delightful! I never know what to do with a bag of butterscotch chips either.

  11. Well I hope the mystery of the clicking stove is soon solved, in the meantime I guess it’s a good excuse to bake up a few more cookies!

  12. Oh goodness. What a pain in the butt you’re having to put up with! I’m sorry. It’s great that you were still able to produce these beautiful cookies, though. :)

    And butterscotch! YUM! I’m a butterscotch fiend.

  13. love everything about these cookies, wishing I had a few right now!

  14. I hope the stove is being fixed my now. I love a good excuse to bake some cookies, even if it’s for the repair man ;)

  15. I hope your stove gets fixed quickly. I hate having to deal with repairmen not being able to find out what the issue is and coming back repeatedly.
    The cookies look fabulous! I love butterscotch, and the chocolate in the background sounds like a great pair.

  16. Jean – I had the same issue with my Viking cooktop and my husband responded the same way yours does. Lucky my hubby is handy and fixed it. Glad yours is working again sans clicking! :-) These cookies look and sound amazing!!!

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  1. [...] come in all kinds of flavors. The best ones are the ones that mix flavors and textures. These Chocolate-Butterscotch Oatmeal cookies do just that. Taking a traditional oatmeal cookie recipe and changing up the ingredients a [...]

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